Thursday, September 04, 2014

Hans Koert (1951 - 2014)

Hans Koert (1951-2014)
Dear readers,

I had the sad news this afternoon that Hans Koert passed away this morning. Hans Koert died from complications caused by a lung cancer that has kept him inactive at his website and blogs for some months. I have lost a dear friend, however, my thoughts and condolences in this difficult hour I forward to Corrie, Hans' wife, 

If you wish to express your compassion or send a condolence notification, I will state Corrie's postal address below. You may also state your message by notifying me at the e-mail address below, then I'll forward your message to Corrie. As always, you can also use the comment facility at the blog, if you prefer this solution.

Hans Koert was the founder and main editor of the Keep Swinging website including under-webs and blogs. Before it was too late, I promised Hans to continue his work the best I can. If you have questions or comments regarding this, please feel free to contact me in an e-mail.

Here is the postal address of Corrie Koert:

Ms. Corrie Koert
Torenvalkstee 8
NL-4451 CM Heinkenszand
The Netherlands

The e-mail address to send condolence notification or questions, please use this:

keepitswinging.domain@gmail.com

Thank you for your support!

Jørgen Larsen

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

In Memory of Jacob do Bandolim (1918-1969)

Jacob do Bandolim
Jacob Pick Bittencourt - better known as Jacob do Bandolim - was born February 14, 1918, in Rio de Janeiro and passed away August 13, 1969, Rio de Janeiro. Jacob do Bandolim is one of the most important figures in Brazilian choro, and he has left a legacy of recordings and more than 100 compositions which will secure him a place among the best and most respected Brazilian musicians forever. He had his nickname after the instrument he devoted his musical skills - the bandolim is the Brazilian issue of the mandolin, - and he was the originator of a way of playing the bandolim, which has been adopted by countless other bandolinistas in Brazil and elsewhere. Jacob do Bandolim had a profound impact on generations of choro musicians - not only through his work as a musician and composer, but also as a researcher of choro and as a radio and TV host of programs devoted to choro and live performance by both amateurs and professional musicians excelling in this kind of music and related genres. Further, Jacob do Bandolim also arranged informal choro gatherings ( - rodas de choro) at his home and invited special guests to participate and help refining, sharing and evolving musical ideas, a tireless and demanding effort that at times would last for days and nights. All this work was a full time job, nevertheless Jacob do Bandolim had to support his financial income through a 'day job' as an insurance agent or street vendor until the State Govenment secured him employment as a civil servant with a steady income towards the end of his life. Jacob do Bandolim was a victim of a heart attack on August 13, 1969, he died on his way home from a visit to Pixinguinha's house where he had discussed and planned new musicial projects with his mentor and friend. - A more detailed profile of Jacob do Bandolim's career is available here and the official website in Portuguese devoted to everything regarding Jacob do Bandolim can be reached here.

Jacob do Bandolim, c. 1950
Jacob do Bandolim recorded his first session featuring César Faria e seu conjunto in October 1947, only two sides were recorded and released on a 78 rpm disc. A choro by Jacob, Treme-treme, was on the A-side



In 1951 Jacob do Bandolim started recording for RCA and was backed by musicians, who had been members of flutist Benedito Lacerda's ensemble, now lead by the cavaquinho player of the grounp called Regional do Canhoto

Jacob and Regional do Canhoto, 1950s
In 1951 Jacob recorded his choro Doce de coco with Regional do Canhoto, a composition that since has been part of the standard choro repertoire



Jacob recorded several sessions with Regional do Canhoto from 1951 to 1961, in 1957 he recorded the choro Noites Cariocas, an all-time hit since then associated with Jacob and the nightlife of Rio



In 1965 Jacob formated his most famous group, Epoca de Ouro, featuring members that had backed him since start of the 1960s under other names such as Jacob e seus chorões and Jacob e seu regional

Jacob and Epoca de Ouro, 1960s
Jacob and Epoca de Ouro had their greatest success with the 1967 recording of the RCA LP-album titled Vibrações, the title track of this album is another choro by Jacob, which forever is associated with him and the spirit of Brazilian choro



After Jacob do Bandolim's untimely death in 1969 the Epoca de Ouro ensemble dissolved, but the group reunited in 1973 and had a profound impact on the revival of choro in Brazil during the 1970s. The Epoca de Ouro is still an active choro ensemble today with new members in the group taking over and continuing a tradition and reliving a body of musical works associated with Jacob do Bandolim and his legacy.

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Jo
choromusic.blogspot@gmail.com

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

André Juarez & Grupo Gato Preto

The present heatwave at my spot on the Globe prevents me from a long and detailed blog-entry this time, however, here are a couple of lines about a CD that surprised me recently after listening to it at a streaming service. I do not have the actual CD at hand, and the info offered at music streaming service suppliers is often not very useful or directly non existent, unfortunately. A lack of respect for curious and serious music listeners, I am sorry to say.

André Juarez & Grupo Gato Preto - Jazz-Choro (Pôr do Som)
The black cat staring intensely at the viewer on the front cover of the CD by André Juarez and Grupo Gato Preto refers both to the name of the group ( - 'gato preto' in fact means 'black cat' in English) and insider slang expressions in jazz, where 'cat' often refers to an experienced musician who knows his instrument and the music as another alley cat knows his territory. André Juarez definitly is a 'cat', who knows his instrument in and out, and with a musical background in both classical music, MPB and jazz, he has extended his territory to include choro convincingly in the tracks of this CD, that further has the genre title stated as 'jazz-choro'.

André Juarez - Photo credit by Elizabete Colovatti
André Juarez is a vibraphonist, arranger and conductor from São Paulo with a career in both erudite and popular music. He had his musical training and academic degrees in music both in São Paulo and at Berklee College, USA, he conducts the São Paulo University Choir and has worked with various orchestras and conducters as an instrumentalist both in Brazil and abroad. In addition to his academic career he also formed his own ensembles on the basis of his engagement in both Brazilian popular music, jazz and - choro. A more detailed career profile is available in Portuguese and English at his official wesite, here.

André Juarez and Grupo Gato Preto
The Grupo Gato Preto was formed in 2006 by André Juarez and São Paulo musicians, and according to the website info the ensemble currently is composed of Euclides Marques (seven-string guitar), Yves Finzetto (pandeiro), Getúlio Ribeiro (cavaquinho) and André Juarez (vibraphone) as shown on the photo above. The group has the research and studies of choro music's traditional as well as contemporary repertoire as the main target and the shown CD above is the ensemble's first recording. The vibraphone is an unusual instrument in choro, nevertheless it has the leading voice in this recording and in the ensemble's public performance. The Grupo Gato Preto has had success with its formation and has already won awards for its performance in 2010, 2011 and 2013. The band has been on successful tours abroad 2012 (USA) and 2013 (Argentina) and will be on tour again in August 2014 (Europe), more info at Juarez' website.

The formation of Gato Preto at the CD differs from the mentioned, as Léo Rodrigues (Pandeiro) and Henrique Araújo (cavaquinho) replace Yves Finzetto and Getúlio Ribeiro respectively, and the ensemble further has invited guest performers in some of the tracks, they are the following: Nailor Proveta (clarinet), Teco Cardoso (flute), Bocato (trombone), Edmundo Villani-Côrtes (piano), Danilo Brito (bandolim,cavaco), Mane Silveira (saxophone) and Tiago Pinheiro (vocal). 

The chosen repertoire for the thirteen tracks of the CD partially consists of well known compositions by choro celebrities such as Pixinguinha (Um a Zero, Segura Ele), Jacob do Bandolim (Assanhado) and Valdir Azevedo (Brasileirinho, Pedacinhos do Céu). A version of the classic André do Sapato Novo ( by André Vitor Correia and known from versions by Pixinguinha/Lacerda 1947 as well as Jacob do Bandolim's 1956 issue, among many other) - here complete with suspense pauses and inserted bites of other popular themes. Further there are two versions of Alberto Martino's beautiful waltz, Rapaziada do Braz, one of them with added vocal by Tiago Pinheiro singing the lyrics, the other as an instrumental piece. There are also three compositions especially  arranged for this recording, the title track, Gato Preto, with guest performer Nailor Proveta added on clarinet, a frevo-inspired composition titled André no Frevo featuring Edmundo Villani- Côrtes on piano  and a classic choro theme titled Vida em Sonho, which has Danilo Brito added on violão tenor or cavaco, I assume. Finally, a tip-of-the hat to legendary flutist Copinha in the choro  titled Salve, Copinha with guest performer Teco Cardoso on flute, and the CD ends with a small musical joke in a solo version by Adré Juraez of the waltz Sobre as Ondas (- in English better known as Over The Waves) that continues in a perfect inserted version of the tune played by a barrel organ! - The music is well arranged and performed throughout the CD, and the lead voice by the vibraphone adds a pleasant sound to the performance that reminds me of soft jazz yet with a nerve and drive, which is unmistakably Brazilian exellently supported by the contributions of the ensemble and invited guest performers. A different version of great choro tunes and well worth listening to over again, indeed.

The CD was released by the Pôr do Som label last year and is available for purchase at Amazon in a mp3 download version. Both at the site of Pôr do Som and at André Juarez' website you have the opportunity to listen to selected tracks from the CD and further watch some recorded video takes of live-performance presenting material from the CD. I'll end this small review inserting one of the videos that has the recorded studio audio of the composition titled Gato Preto - enjoy! 



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Jo
choromusic.blogspot@gmail.com

Monday, June 23, 2014

1 X 0

There has always been a tight association between music and soccer in Brazil, to this day Brazilian soccer is often referred to as 'samba football' in the media, although it was a choro music celebrity, who linked the association of soccer and music from the start. Pixinguinha's choro "Um a Zero" is the first registered Brazilian composition that celebrates soccer and its players. The background of the title is documented in this entry that also celbrates the first Brazilian star in a line of legendary Brazilian soccer players, Arthur Friedenreich.


Benedito Lacerda (flute), Pixinguinha (saxophone), c. 1946
"1X0" (Um a zero) is a well known and popular choro composed by Pixinguinha and recorded for the first time in 1946 as a co-work with Benedito Lacerda on a 78 rpm disc (Victor 800442A). Lacerda plays the melody part on flute, Pixinguinha contributes second voice and fill-ins on tenor saxophone accompanied by Lacerda's conjunto regional.


The title of this choro has a special background, the music was composed as a tribute to the Brazilian soccer team that won the 1919 South American championship and its first international soccer title in a match with Uruguay with the result 1-0 in favour of the Brazilian team (- thus the title, which in Portuguese reads 'um a zero').

The 1919 Brazilian soccer team
The single goal which secured the Brazilian team victory and the championship was scored by Arthur Friedenreich, the first character in a line of famous Brazilian soccer players.

Arthur Friedenreich (source: Wikipedia)
Arthur Friedenreich (1892-1969) was the son of a German immigrant and his wife, the daughter of a black freed slave. Due to his dark tan Arthur Friedenreich became the first black professional soccer player in Brazil. He started his career influenced by his father, playing for SC Germania, a Brazilian soccer team in São Paulo composed of German immigrants. After playing with a succession of São Paulo clubs from 1910 onwards, Friedenreich made his debut with the national team in 1914. He played twenty-two internationals, including wins in the 1919 and 1922 editions of the Copa América, scoring ten goals. On Brazil's 1925 tour of Europe, he was feted as the King of soccer (- and nicknamed 'The Tiger'). He also has a claim to the highest scoring record, but FIFA cannot prove these goals because of incomplete record-keeping.

Arthur Friedenreich secures the victory 1-0, 1919
As mentioned, Friedenreich was the first black professional soccer player in Brazil. He had to fight for his career both inside and outside the arena, because at that time soccer was dominated by whites and blacks were generally not accepted. He faced many barriers because of racism, and he could not always attend the same places where white players were. However, his scoring of the single goal in the 1919 match was a turning point that secured him accept and a  deserved place in the Brazilian soccer's Hall of Fame. And it was to honor this first black star in a line of legendary Brazilian soccer players that Pixinguinha composed his 'choro vivo', "Um a zero" (1x0).

Multi string virtuoso Garoto (Anibal Augusto Sardinha)
As a prelude to the alleged repeated success of the soccer World Cup 1950 in Brazil, where Brazil again was to meet Uruguay in the decisive final, Garoto (Anibal Augusto Sardinha, 1915-55) had recorded his version of "Um a Zero" in 1949 as a tribute to the Brazilian team. Unfortunately, this time Brazil lost the championship with the result 2-1 in favour of Urguay (- still a national trauma to this day!). However, the music recorded by Garoto forever stands out as one of the best recorded versions of Pixinguinha's choro


Pixinguinha's "Um a Zero" is the first registered musical composition that celebrates soccer in Brazil and honors its players. Although the music wasn't recorded before 1946 and copyrighted 1947, the score was composed at the time of the event it celebrates - Pixinguinha is said to have attended the audience at the legendary 1919 match between Brazil and Uruguay, and to express his enthusiasm for the result, he went straight home and composed the music of "1x0/Um a Zero".

NB!
The photos documenting the 1919 match betwen Brazil and Uruguay inserted above are copied from this sourceThe story of Arthur Friedenreich and inspiration for this entry owes thanks to this source.
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Jo

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Choro Conversations

Brazilian choro was for a long time an unfamiliar musical phenomenon outside Brazil. Few available music recordings of original Brazilian choro, even less printed music and only scattered articles in popular or academic journals from Portuguese-speaking researchers and writers have been the usual approach of other nations' knowledge of choro. In fact, it is only within the last 10 years that there has finally been released a survey of choro music history in English. The basic description of the story of choro in English was made public accessible with the release of the excellent 'Choro - A Social History of a Brazilian Popular Music' by T.E. Livingston-Isenhour & T.G.C. Garcia in 2005 (Indiana University Press).
At the same time Mika Kaurismäki's documentary on choro, 'Brasileirinho', was released and presented a fascinating filmed view of the contemporary choro scene in Rio including interviews with musicians and live recording of choro music performance - a great documentation of a rich musical tradition and its contemporary practitioners recorded in 2002 on location in Rio and released worldwide in 2005.
A little later the Brazilian flutist, Daniel Dalarossa, founded the Global Choro Music company with offices in both the U.S. and Brazil aiming to spread the knowledge of choro by providing commercial publications of highly qualified arrangements of play-along choro music sheet including original CD recordings of the material designated for musicians interested in learning to play choro - a giant step to spread the knowledge of choro and choro practise among musicians worldwide.

Daniel Dalarossa & Julie Koidin
Daniel Dalarossa also took the initiative to publish another major contribution to contemporary choro. In 2011, the American flutist, Julie Koidin, published a series of interviews in Portuguese with choro musicians and other personages, all with connections to choro in Brazil, in her book 'Os Sorrisos do Choro' printed and published by Global Choro Music, and next, in 2013, the translation in English with the close assistance of Daniel Dalarossa, 'Choro Conversations -  Pursuing Life, Love and Brazil's Musical Identity', also was published by Global Choro Music.
The printed English version of 'Choro Conversations' contains more than 500 pages in a paperback format and registers the live story of choro through 52 interviews with a broad range of characters involved with choro from Rio to Brasília and from the Northeast to São Paulo. In 2002, Julie Koidin started her research for this project with the assistance of a  Fulbright lecture-research grant.

Julie Koidin, (Press photo)
Chicago born flutist, Julie Koidin, is a professional musician and music teacher. She traveled to Brazil for the first time in 1997 and has since returned eighteen times to research choro, perform, and give masterclasses throughout the country. A detailed career profile is available here
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In her introduction of the book Julie Koidin gives an account of how she personally got involved with choro and Brazil through a string of coincidences that led to her first visit to Brazil and a lasting friendship with world renowned flutist Altamiro Carrilho, who became her personal teacher and guide into the choro community. Then follows the main part of the book with interviews of characters from Rio, Brasilia, Fortaleza, Natal, Recife and São Paulo.

Each interview is framed by a contextual review of the circumstances of the interview, and all interviews follow a structure of questions setting out to clear the family background of the interviewed, his or her introduction to choro, influences and what instrument was chosen as a musician, how and when the learning process started and progressed. Further, also questions about the attitude of the interviewed to choro as a music genre or style and its contemporary and future situation. Finally also the question about which single choro composition the interviewed would prefer bringing with him or her if having to be living on a desert island for the rest of life. This approach to all interviewed generates a lot of interesting (- sometimes contradicting) answers, anecdotes and facts that provide the reader of the book with a lot of useful and entertaining knowledge about choro as perceived by its living practioners at the time of the interview. 

The book is an excellently written oral documentation of the state of art in the choro community of Brazil on the threshold of this millennium and the 500 plus pages are easy to overcome. The reader is engaged by the personal engagement and involvement with the subject shown off on every page and all the way through the book by both the interviewer and the interviewed individuals. - The book moreover has a detailed index, bibliography and notes to each interview and a glossary in English of frequently quoted Portuguese words, concepts and phrases with affinity for choro and Brazilian institutions.

As an important supplement to the above mentioned pioneering work in English on choro history by T.E. Livingston-Isenhour & T.G.C. Garcia, Julie Koidin's magnificent book of interviews undoubtedly will help new readers to better understand and appreciate choro as both a genuine Brazilian phenomenon and as an expression of a cultural identity that involves a community founded on mutual understanding, accept and friendship. Recommended, definitly!

The book is available for purchase here or by contacting Global Choro Music, here

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Jo

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Pixinguinha and Choro Day

Pixinguinha (1897-1973)
Alfredo da Rocha Vianna Filho (1897-1973), better known as Pixinguinha, was a choro composer, arranger, flutist and saxophonist born in Rio de Janeiro. Through the legacy of the pioneering choro composers of the 19th century and of the Afro-Brazilian tradition, Pixinguinha produced some of the most important choro works of all time. His work as a composer, bandleader, flutist/reedplayer and originator of the choro genre is of invaluable importance, historically and from a musical point of view. The work of Pixinguinha may be considered important at the same level as the work of initial American jazz composers like Duke Ellington - both helped shaping a musical form that had success nationally and internationally.


The name and legacy of Pixinguinha is kept well alive in Brazil, in September 2000 President Fernando Henrique Cardoso signed an official document to announce April 23th the National Day of Choro in Brazil in honor of Pixinguinha. Every year since then choro has been celebrated officially on the 23th of April through countless events in Brazil and around the world where Brasilian culture is a part of the local community. Let's follow this tradition and celebrate the day by playing some choro music by Pixinguinha.

Os Oito Batutas
Pixinguinha demonstrated ability on both flute and cavaquinho as a kid and started composing at an early age. By the age of 14, he had composed his first choro, 'Lata de leite', and was already an accomplished flute player. In 1913, he made his first choro recordings, and by the time he was 15, he was playing professionally - at 18 he was one of the most popular musicians and choro composers in Rio de Janeiro. In 1919, Pixinguinha formed the legendary Os Oito Batutas (- meaning 'The Eight Remarkable Players' in English). The group consisted of flute (- and later saxophone), guitars, cavaquinho, bandolim, bandola, pandeiro and assorted percussion. - Led by Pixinguinha, Oito Batutas was formed to entertain the audience of Rio's prestigious Cinema Palais in its foyer. Opening on April 7, 1919, the group was a success from its debut. The Carioca élite were taken by surprise by the repertory of maxixes, sertanejo songs, batuques, cateretês, and choros. In 1920, the group performed for the King of Belgium and in the next year they toured Brazil. Returning to Rio, they went to play at the luxurious Assírio Club, accompanying the dancing duo Duque & Gaby. In January 1922, the group departed for Paris, France, financed by millionaire Arnaldo Guinle. Introduced as Les Batutas at the Scherazade club, they performed there for six months with great success. - Also in 1922, they left for Argentina, performing at the Empire Theater (Buenos Aires) and recorded 20 sides for the Argentinean Victor label. Upon their return to Brazil in 1923, they diminished their performances until they soon dissolved the group. - Among the recorded material by Oito Batutas there was a composotion by initial guitar choro originator, João Pernambuco, who was a member of the group for some time - here his choro 'Graúna' is performed by Pixinguinha on flute accompanied by the Batutas 



In the late 1920s, Pixinguinha was hired by RCA Victor to lead the Orquestra Victor Brasileira, and during his tenure there he refined his skills as an arranger. It was common for choro musicians at the time to improvise their parts based on a simple piano score, but the growing demand for radio music from large ensembles required fully realized written scores for every instrument, and Pixinguinha was one of the few composers with this skill. It was in this role that he created some of his most famous compositions, i.e. 'Lamentos' and 'Carinhoso' - Here is inserted the original recording of 'Lamentos' from 1928 



Benedito Lacerda (flute), Pixinguinha (saxophone)
In 1939, Pixinguinha left Victor to join flautist Benedito Lacerda's band, where he took up the tenor saxophone as his primary instrument and continued to compose music for the group. Lacerda's band was a conjunto regional, the name given to in-house bands hired by radio stations to perform music and accompany singers, often live in front of a studio audience. It was with Lacerda that Pixinguinha began another fertile period of composing and recording. Due to economic troubles as the regionais fell out of favor in the late 40s, Pixinguinha had to sell the rights to his compositions to Benedito Lacerda, who for this appears a co-composer of many of Pixinguinha's tunes, even those composed while Lacerda was still a boy. In the recordings with Lacerda, Pixinguinha plays secondary parts on the saxophone while Lacerda plays the flute part on tunes that Pixinguinha originally wrote on that instrument. - Here's an example of the co-work between Pixinguinha and Lacerda, the recording of Pixinguinha's choro 'Vou vivendo' (1946)



By the mid 1950s, changing tastes and the emerging popularity of samba and American jazz in Brazil led to the decline of the choro regional as other genres became dominant on the radio. Pixinguinha spent his time in retirement, appearing in public only on rare occasions. - Here's a rare film from this period showing Pixinguiha and his conjunto playing his famous choro 'Um a zero' - enjoy!



Pixinguinha's music continues to inspire and challenge musicians of all kind to play their version of his famous compositions, here's a new uploaded video showing the harmonicaplayer Vitor Lopes performing 'Lamentos' as a solo piece to end this small celebration of Pixinguinha and Choro Day



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Jo

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Rio, Choro, Jazz - A Contemporary Tribute To Ernesto Nazareth

CD cover: Rio, Choro, Jazz ... AAM Music, 2014
A new CD by the Brazilian pianist, composer, arranger and producer Antonio Adolfo is a tribute to the music of Ernesto Nazareth recorded last year and released a couple of weeks ago at Adolfo's own label, AAM Music. The CD has ten tracks, nine of them are compositions by Nazareth and the title track is a new composition by Antonio Adolfo, a contemporary interpretation of the different musical influences that are the inspiration of this project: choro and jazz. The musicians taking part in the recorded ten tracks are: Antonio Adolfo (piano, arranger), Claudio Spiewak (guitars), Jorge Helder (bass), Marcelo Martins (flute, soprano saxophone), Rafael Barata (drums, percussion) and Marcos Suzano (percussion). - The nine featured compositions by Nazareth are "Feitiço" (1897), "Brejeiro" (1893), "Fon-fon" (1913), "Tenebroso" (1913), "Não caio noutra" (1881), "Coração que sente" (1903), "Cuéra" (1912), "Nenê" (1895) and "Odeon" (1909) - the audio of the last mentioned in Antonio Adolfo's new arrangement has been uploaded at YouTube



What caracterizes Adolfo's interpretations of Nazareth's music is the freedom of improvisation, an element exposed in both choro and jazz, here in a contemporary form that may be considered a hybrid between the two genres. The result is neither traditional jazz nor choro, but a mixture that blows fresh air into Nazareth's musical themes through be bop inspired improvisation - in the liner notes Adolfo mentions Bill Evans as an inspiration working with the arrangements featured on the disc.

Antonio Adolfo
Antonio Adolfo (b 1947) grew up in a musical family in Rio de Janeiro and began his studies at the age of seven. At seventeen he was already a professional musician. His teachers include Eumir Deodato and Nadia Boulanger. During the 60's he led his own trio and toured with singers Elis Regina and Milton Nascimento. Adolfo wrote tunes that gained great success and have been recorded by such artists as Sérgio Mendes, Stevie Wonder, Herb Alpert, Earl Klugh, Dionne Warwick, and others. He won International Song Contests on two occasions. As a musician and arranger he has worked with some of the most representative Brazilian names, besides having released several albums. In 1985 he created his own school of music in Rio de Janeiro. Currently he is conducting a music school in Hollywood and teaches Brazilian music and jazz. More info on Antonio Adolfo's career at his official website, here 

Antonio Adolfo, photo by Paul Constantinides
The new arrangements of Nazareth's music by Antonio Adolfo continue and extend a longtime fascination with the founders of Brazilian Choro music, Adolfo released another CD featuring music by Nazareth and Chiquinha Gonzaga in 1991 and he has participated in other choro and jazz projects in Brazil as well. To end this small review of the new CD, here's another audio take from the CD uploaded at YouTube, Nazareth's "Fon-Fon"



The CD Rio, Choro, Jazz ... by Antonio Adolfo is available for purchase here.
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Jo