Sunday, July 16, 2006

The Six and Seven-Eights Stringband of NO

Hans has kindly asked me to supply you with daily postings here, while he is away on his holidays walking the dark forests of some German province and therefore is unable to update his keepswinging-blog. Thus, I'll start this task filling in some discographical info regarding the recordings by The Six and Seven-Eights Stringband of New Orleans - a subject, which was discussed some time ago at the keepswinging blog.
Until recently the Folkways/Smithsonian issue of recordings by The Six and Seven-Eights Stringband of NO was the only available, but now a new cd with all known recordings by this group finally has been released by an English label, 504 Records, CD28. According to the sleeve notes of this cd here is the correct discographical info:
(A): Bill Kleppinger (man), Bernie Shields (steel g), Frank "Red" Mackie (sb), Dr. Edmond Souchon (g,voc)
New Orleans, March 1950
:
- Floating Down The Old Green River
- Who's Sorry Now
- Tiger Rag
- Tico-Tico
- Up A Lazy River/There'll Be Some Changes Made
- Donna Clara
(B): Same personnel,
New Orleans, August 1954
- Winter Nights/Stumblin'
- Who's Sorry Now
- Clarinet Marmelade
- Jealous
- Tico-Tico
- Floating Down The Old Green River
- Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen
- Sunrise Sunset
- Medley in 'D'
- Josephine
- When The Saints Go Marching In
(C): Same personnel,
New Orleans, September 1954
- Winter Nights/Stumbling
- Original Dixieland One Step
- Floating Down The Old Green River
(D): Bill Kleppinger (man), Bernie Shields (steel g), Frank "Red" Mackie (sb), Rene Gelpi (bj), Charlie Hardy (uke), Dr. Edmond Souchon (g)
New Orleans, August 1955

- That Old Gang Of Mine
- Who's Sorry Now
- Panama
- High Society
(E): same as (A), but omit Bill Kleppinger, add Yvonne Treiner (voc)
New Orleans, August 1955
- You'll Never Know
(F): Rene Gelpi (bj), Charlie Hardy (uke), Dr. Edmond Souchon (p)
New Orleans, August 1955

- Canadian Capers
These recordings and the stated info above are what is available regarding The Six and Seven-Eights Stringband of New Orleans. I strongly recommend the mentioned new cd-release, which has better audio and 'new' material compared to the Folkways/Smithsonian issue.
Jo

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Frank Mackie was my Uncle "Red." He was an enormous influence on me,living with us (his brother Dick Mackie's family) until his death. He was a phenomenal, intuitive musician, claiming never to have known how to read music, but able to analyze harmonically and at an instant all to which he listened. He was a passionate lover of classical music, and, on my 17th birthday, gave me the penultimate recording of the Sibelius 1st Symphony ( Ormany, Philadelphia), saying, "Listen to this the first time with me." He explicated the piece, every modulation and Sibelian novelty, measure by measure. An extraordinary experience, transformational for me. Uncle Red could play any instrument that came into his burly hands, and was the mentor of my incredible bother, Hank Mackie, one of the greatest guitarists ever to to emerge in New Orleans.

Rick Mckie

12 July, 2009  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

A correction to:

E): same as (A), but omit Bill Kleppinger, add Yvonne Treiner (voc)

Should be Yvonne Triemer, who was my mother. When I was in second grade, the Six and Seven Eights played in my grandmother's living room. She was Uncle Charlie Hardy's sister. I got to peek in and watch while my mother sang along with the band.

Ann Triemer-Heathman

13 June, 2011  

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